GLORIAM DEO • Honor and Praise to the Maker of All Things

GLORIAMDEO.COM • Honor and Praise to the Maker of All Things (701) 588-4541     |    GLORIAMDEO.COM • Honor and Praise to the Maker of All Things  Contact Us    |    GLORIAMDEO.COM • Honor and Praise to the Maker of All Things    |

What is Love?

I “love” Jackie’s curry chicken dinner.

I “love” pepperoni and Italian sausage pizza.

I “love” German chocolate cake . . . and sour cream raisin pie.

I “love” reading, and traveling, and heading off on exciting new adventures, and I love many thousands of other things . . .

Most everyone would probably say something similar.

But, WHAT IS “LOVE?”

A group of children were asked this question, “What is love?” . . . and they came back with some very thoughtful and insightful answers.

Billy, age 4, said, “Love is what makes you smile when you’re tired.”

Terri, age 4, offered that “Love is when you go out to eat, and give somebody most of your French fries without making them give you any of theirs.”

Chrissy, age 6, confided that “If you want to learn to love better, you should start with a kid you hate.”

If I were to offer my two cents, I would say that

— “Love is committing everything — giving away (“losing”) everything —

for the benefit of those you hold most dear.”

Love is an active, ongoing commitment

— a promise to keep with the Maker of All Things —

to be always faithful (“semper fidelis“) until the moment of your death, when you breathe your last breath and feel your last heartbeat, and pass from this world of time into eternity.

Soldiers in war do this all the time, often, amazingly, without the least hesitation.

Love is more than “being willing” to commit everything.

Love is really committing everything — no turning back.

United States Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 • Gloriam Deo • Honor and Praise to the Maker of All Things
United States Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776 • Gloriam Deo • Honor and Praise to the Maker of All Things

On July 4, 1776, 56 men signed their names to the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America.

They stated, clearly and boldly in writing,

“. . . with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence,

we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”

Their commitment

— of love —

meant that if the British ever captured them, if their fight for independence did not succeed, they would be hanged as traitors to the Crown of England.

These 56 men absolutely committed their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor

— no turning back —

to the independence of a brand new country — the United States of America.

I cannot help but stand silently,
honoring them with the most profound respect,
regarding them with the most profound reverence.

Who do you love?

What do you fight for?